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2016

Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme 2016

IKIRU - The Highs and Lows of Life in Japanese Cinema

5 February to 26 March 2016

Inspired by Akira Kurosawa’s iconic 1952 film Ikiru (“To Live”), the Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme 2016 looked at the way in which Japanese filmmakers have been observing and capturing people’s lives, and how people across the ages persevere, negotiate and reconcile with the environment and situation they live in.

 

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2015

It Only Happens in the Movies?

Japanese Cinema and Encounters

30 January to 26 March 2015

This year’s Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme will provide an exciting programme of films under the narrative framework of ‘encounters’. Showcasing a vast variety of styles and tones, from popular contemporary films, classics through to animation, the programme will include titles in which characters experience seemingly unusual meetings, plunge into unexpected circumstances and new environments, as well as collide with different generations, ideals and ideas – asking the question, does it really only happen in the movies?

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2014

East Side Stories

Japanese Cinema Depicting the Lives of Youth

31 January to 27 March 2014

In 2014, the Japan Foundation UK annual touring film programme offered an enlightening and expansive introduction to Japanese cinema through the framework of ‘youth’. The programme took a broad look at how the adults of tomorrow have been portrayed in Japanese cinema over the years by a number of established and up-and-coming directors, through stories of individuals struggling to find a sense of meaning and identity within the world.

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2013

Once Upon a Time in Japan

Reinventing the Past Through the Eyes of Japanese Contemporary Filmmakers

1 February to 27 March 2013

Marking its 10th anniversary, the Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme in 2013 looked back into the past through the eyes of contemporary filmmakers. Touching upon a trend prevalent in recent Japanese cinema, the season showcased a series of works from directors including Takashi Miike, Sunao Katabuchi, Hirokazu Kore-eda and Isshin Inudo, who all share the same aspiration to reinterpret and relive moments of times gone by through a variety of genres, styles and tones.

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2012

Whose Film Is It Anyway?

Contemporary Japanese Auteurs

10 February to 28 March 2012

The ninth Japan Foundation annual touring film programme looked at narrative creativity by contemporary Japanese directors in contrast to the recent storm of adaptations, and how they express their voices through cinema. Ranging from the emerging to the established, the programme showcases directors who are not necessarily well-represented in this country, but whose works demonstrate their keen creativity.

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2011

Back to the Future

Japanese Cinema Since the Mid-90s

4 February to 28 March 2011

The 2011 Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme focussed on the marked resurgence of Japanese cinema from the mid-1990s onwards. Including established names such as Kiyoshi Kurosawa and Takashi Miike, as well as up-and-coming talent Yuya Ishii, the featured directors have carved a new path for the future and contributed to the recent success of Japanese cinema around the world. Showcasing a great breadth of creativity, the 2011 line-up offered UK audiences an insight into a pivotal period which changed the landscape of Japanese cinema and provided the industry with a new lease of life.

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2010

Girls on Film

Females in Contemporary Japanese Cinema

9 February to 21 March 2010

The 2010 Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme considered Japanese cinema made for, about, and, in some cases, by women. Women have continuously been at the centre of Japanese cinema, with notable examples being films by Kenji Mizoguchi and Mikio Naruse, and even the animated works of Hayao Miyazaki.

This programme presents works from the past few years and showcases how Japanese contemporary filmmakers, from the very established such as the late Jun Ichikawa, to young and promising filmmakers like Satoko Yokohama, approach the issues facing women. This season also includes works by female directors, reflecting the exciting trend of a marked increase in the number of female directors working in the Japanese film industry.

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2009

Reality Fiction

Japanese films inspired by actual events

6 February to 19 March 2009

In 2009, The Japan Foundation Touring Film Programme looked at how Japanese filmmakers have been influenced by actual events, some of which have shaped the nation’s recent history.

Screening at five venues across the UK, the six films which date from the 1960s to 2007 are among the best produced in Japan and showcase how real-life stories have been a source of inspiration for many filmmakers in Japan and how they have interpreted and represented such events.

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2008

A Life More Ordinary

A Portrait of Contemporary Japanese People on Film

9 February to 22 March 2008

In 2008 The Japan Foundation presented a touring programme of six new Japanese films. Strawberry Shortcakes portrays four young women in Tokyo; The Cat Leaves Home is the tale of two mismatched housemates; offbeat comedy No One’s Ark sees a couple leave Tokyo to follow new dreams in their home town; The Milkwoman, set in Nagasaki, is a love story spanning five decades; Kaza Hana is a deathly road trip; and comic-book adaptation Kamikaze Girls looks at fashion subculture in Japan.

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2007

Move Over Ozu

Does Modern Japanese cinema have more to it than ghosts, guns and gangsters?

4 February to 29 March 2007

Since the classic names such as Ozu and Kurosawa were first introduced in the UK, the tastes and direction of Japanese cinema have shifted. Japan has also changed a great deal socially but the family is still a central concern for contemporary film-makers, providing a canvas for them to portray changes in attitudes and relationships in society.

The touring film programme in 2007 represented contemporary Japanese films all firmly rooted in the real world, and which shed light on the complexities of modern life in Japan. Widely covering genres from comedy to tragedy, drama to social criticism, these are hidden gems, guaranteed to be entertaining.

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2006

Comic Proportions

Japanese Films Adapted from Manga

4 February to 28 February 2006

Not just for kids and a very significant part of the country’s subculture, Japanese comics (manga) have increasingly become a source of inspiration for Japanese filmmakers, particularly of the younger generation. The result is a new wave of cinema bursting with visual invention and exciting ideas as directors break down and reconstruct images and stories already created by artists in another medium.

The Touring Film Programme in 2006 represented a handful of examples of live-action manga, a selection which ranges widely across style and genre but which is united by a guarantee of extravagant entertainment.

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2005

Japanese Film after Mr Pink

It was just before the last millennium that Kinema Junpo, Japan’s most prestigious film journal reflected the worldwide influence made by the American director, Quentine Tarantino and noted that a number of Japanese young film makers who emerged in to the Japanese film scene from the mid 90s, quite arguably, as “Post-Tarantino Directors”. Although their style and work are unique to each film maker, they all belong to a generation where videos were the most accessible tool for watching films and where digital technology is part of their life; they feel comfortable in sampling and remixing details of films of the past, presenting a new world of moving image.

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2004

Others - Self, Identity and the Outsider in Recent Japanese Film

Aaron Gerow, an Associate Professor of Japanese Film and Culture at Yokohama National University identified a new trend in recent Japanese films, a trend that draws our attention to the concept of “others” in Japan, a term that ranges from non-Japanese to “other” Japanese. It is a trend that attempts to acknowledge inherent differences within Japanese society against a background of crisis in self and identity.

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